The Carlton Restaurant

Archives: September 2009

The Week’s Wine Wisdom

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Red wine, in moderation, has long been thought of as heart healthy. The alcohol and certain substances in red wine called antioxidants may help prevent heart disease by increasing levels of “good” cholesterol and protecting against artery damage.

While the news about red wine might sound great if you enjoy a glass of red wine with your evening meal, doctors are wary of encouraging anyone to start drinking alcohol. That’s because too much alcohol can have many harmful effects on your body.

Still, doctors do agree that something in red wine appears to help your heart, though it’s unclear just exactly what that “something” is. Researchers think antioxidants, such as flavonoids or a substance called resveratrol, have promising heart-healthy benefits.

Antioxidants aren’t the only substances in red wine that look promising. The alcohol in red wine also appears to be heart healthy. Find out what’s known — and not known — about red wine and its possible heart-health benefits.

Source: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/red-wine/HB00089

The Week’s Wine Wisdom

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A History of Mulled Wine: c7233ea4eac80f2cThe word “mulled” simply means heated and spiced. Many liquids can be mulled – mead, cider, and of course wine. Mulled wine is a traditional favorite in cooler locations, and goes well with the various celebrations that come around the end of the year.

Mulled wines have a long history. In medieval times these wines were called Ypocras or Hipocris, named after the physician Hippocrates. They were thought to be very healthy, and indeed, with wine at the time being far more sanitary than water, these heated drinks probably did keep people healthy through the cold winters.

Moving forward to the 1500s, cookbooks listed methods of mulling “Clarrey”, or Bordeaux. Recipes involved honey, cinnamon, cardamon, galingale and of course French wine. Mulled wine was a favorite in Victorian England, and Negus – a type of mulled wine – was even served to children at their birthday parties. Today, mulled wine is a staple at many holiday parties.

Mulled wines today are as varied as sangria recipes. There are different styles in every part of the world – some favor using white wine, others red. Some add in only a few spices, while others pour in oranges, cloves, twelve spices and more fruit for color! Your mulled drink is limited only by your own imagination!

Source: http://www.wineintro.com/mulled/history.html

The Week’s Wine Wisdom

Posted on

A History of Mulled Wine: c7233ea4eac80f2cThe word “mulled” simply means heated and spiced. Many liquids can be mulled – mead, cider, and of course wine. Mulled wine is a traditional favorite in cooler locations, and goes well with the various celebrations that come around the end of the year.

Mulled wines have a long history. In medieval times these wines were called Ypocras or Hipocris, named after the physician Hippocrates. They were thought to be very healthy, and indeed, with wine at the time being far more sanitary than water, these heated drinks probably did keep people healthy through the cold winters.

Moving forward to the 1500s, cookbooks listed methods of mulling “Clarrey”, or Bordeaux. Recipes involved honey, cinnamon, cardamon, galingale and of course French wine. Mulled wine was a favorite in Victorian England, and Negus – a type of mulled wine – was even served to children at their birthday parties. Today, mulled wine is a staple at many holiday parties.

Mulled wines today are as varied as sangria recipes. There are different styles in every part of the world – some favor using white wine, others red. Some add in only a few spices, while others pour in oranges, cloves, twelve spices and more fruit for color! Your mulled drink is limited only by your own imagination!

Source: http://www.wineintro.com/mulled/history.html